SmashPad

“Pokémon Bank” and “Poké Transporter” Reviews

pokemon_bank-656x368

It’s no question that the flagship Pokémon series is one that gamers can heavily dedicate themselves to and be enthusiastically involved with.  Though it’s pretty safe to say that the crazy in the late 90’s into the early 00’s has come and gone, the popular handheld games are better than ever, and thanks to the new Pokémon Bank, keeping and organizing pocket monsters can now be a timeless activity.

What Is It?

Pokémon Bank is exactly what the title suggests.  It’s a service that allows Pokémon players to store and access their pokémon using Cloud technology.  All users need is a Nintendo Network ID, which both 3DS and Wii U owners are prompted to sign up for when first using their latest Nintendo platform.

The service immediately caters to those who own Pokémon X and Y, the only flagship Pokémon games currently available on the 3DS.  However, using the Poké Transporter app (also made available today), players can also upload pokémon by the box from Pokémon Black and White as well as Pokémon Black 2 and White 2.  Unfortunately, the Poké Transporter isn’t compatible with either Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, or Platinum, and they also are not compatible with Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.

The overall purpose of Pokémon Bank isn’t just to store or organize your colorful companions in the cloud.  It’s to make your pokémon accessible for new games in the years to come.

Why Should I Care?

Since the service allows you to store up to 3,000 pokémon, it pretty much gives diehard fans the opportunity to play the game as much as they want and in the process, raise as many pokémon as they want.  The most hardcore Pokémon players, the “EV Trainers,” spend a seemingly endless amount of time catching duplicates of pokémon in hopes of finding types with specific natures and significantly higher stats than others. images

In other words, it’s mostly the competitive Pokémon players that compete in battles and contests that would ideally make the most use out of the service.

At the same time, we’re getting closer and closer to the 20th anniversary of Pocket Monsters, and while it isn’t as popular as it once was, the animated TV series and games continue to receive a lot of attention from fans young and old.  Those who played the game since 1998 may undoubtedly already have children of their own they can call Pokémon fans, and Nintendo likes to hope that people can give their loved ones pokémon they’ve cared for and cherished to young people to continue to have an attachment to for years to come.

To further encourage players to use the service, Pokémon Bank also rewards users with Battle Points and Poké Miles.  So the more pokémon you have stored into the Bank, the more Battle Points and Poké Miles you’re entitled to.

But what about the items your pokémon may or may not carry?  Once uploaded to pokémon bank, the items being held by your pokémon will immediately be put into your bag depending on which Pokémon game you’re playing from, whether it’s on the 3DS or legacy DS.

What Makes It Worth My Time And Money?

celebi_28224.nphd

Players who download the app before March 14 of this year are entitled to a 30-day free trial period to try it out.  To give players another incentive, those who make use of the service are also entitled to get a free Celebi–the legendary grass and psychic-type pokémon from Generation II (Gold, Silver, Crystal, HeartGold, SoulSilver).

After the trial period, the service is offered for $4.99 a year.  Is it worth it?  Well, if you’re someone who really envisions yourself making use of this service, it probably is.  We’ll assume that if you’re old enough to use a credit card or purchase Nintendo Network coins, you’re probably mature enough to make this annual $5 decision.

 
 
 
 
 
Title: Pokémon Bank
Platform: 3DS
Publisher: Nintendo
Developer: Game Freak
Genre: App
Release Date: February 6, 2014
ESRB Rating: E
Developer's Twitter: NintendoAmerica
Editor's Note: The reviewer acquired the App free through the 30-day trial available in the eShop.

It’s no question that the flagship Pokémon series is one that gamers can heavily dedicate themselves to and be enthusiastically involved with.  Though it’s pretty safe to say that the crazy in the late 90’s into the early 00’s has come and gone, the popular handheld games are better than ever, and thanks to the new Pokémon Bank, keeping and organizing pocket monsters can now be a timeless activity. What Is It? Pokémon Bank is exactly what the title suggests. […]

pokemon_bank-656x368

It’s no question that the flagship Pokémon series is one that gamers can heavily dedicate themselves to and be enthusiastically involved with.  Though it’s pretty safe to say that the crazy in the late 90’s into the early 00’s has come and gone, the popular handheld games are better than ever, and thanks to the new Pokémon Bank, keeping and organizing pocket monsters can now be a timeless activity.

What Is It?

Pokémon Bank is exactly what the title suggests.  It’s a service that allows Pokémon players to store and access their pokémon using Cloud technology.  All users need is a Nintendo Network ID, which both 3DS and Wii U owners are prompted to sign up for when first using their latest Nintendo platform.

The service immediately caters to those who own Pokémon X and Y, the only flagship Pokémon games currently available on the 3DS.  However, using the Poké Transporter app (also made available today), players can also upload pokémon by the box from Pokémon Black and White as well as Pokémon Black 2 and White 2.  Unfortunately, the Poké Transporter isn’t compatible with either Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, or Platinum, and they also are not compatible with Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.

The overall purpose of Pokémon Bank isn’t just to store or organize your colorful companions in the cloud.  It’s to make your pokémon accessible for new games in the years to come.

Why Should I Care?

Since the service allows you to store up to 3,000 pokémon, it pretty much gives diehard fans the opportunity to play the game as much as they want and in the process, raise as many pokémon as they want.  The most hardcore Pokémon players, the “EV Trainers,” spend a seemingly endless amount of time catching duplicates of pokémon in hopes of finding types with specific natures and significantly higher stats than others. images

In other words, it’s mostly the competitive Pokémon players that compete in battles and contests that would ideally make the most use out of the service.

At the same time, we’re getting closer and closer to the 20th anniversary of Pocket Monsters, and while it isn’t as popular as it once was, the animated TV series and games continue to receive a lot of attention from fans young and old.  Those who played the game since 1998 may undoubtedly already have children of their own they can call Pokémon fans, and Nintendo likes to hope that people can give their loved ones pokémon they’ve cared for and cherished to young people to continue to have an attachment to for years to come.

To further encourage players to use the service, Pokémon Bank also rewards users with Battle Points and Poké Miles.  So the more pokémon you have stored into the Bank, the more Battle Points and Poké Miles you’re entitled to.

But what about the items your pokémon may or may not carry?  Once uploaded to pokémon bank, the items being held by your pokémon will immediately be put into your bag depending on which Pokémon game you’re playing from, whether it’s on the 3DS or legacy DS.

What Makes It Worth My Time And Money?

celebi_28224.nphd

Players who download the app before March 14 of this year are entitled to a 30-day free trial period to try it out.  To give players another incentive, those who make use of the service are also entitled to get a free Celebi–the legendary grass and psychic-type pokémon from Generation II (Gold, Silver, Crystal, HeartGold, SoulSilver).

After the trial period, the service is offered for $4.99 a year.  Is it worth it?  Well, if you’re someone who really envisions yourself making use of this service, it probably is.  We’ll assume that if you’re old enough to use a credit card or purchase Nintendo Network coins, you’re probably mature enough to make this annual $5 decision.

Date published: 02/06/2014
3 / 5 stars

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Quantcast