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GSE 2013: “Sonic Lost World” Hands-On

48250-sonic-lost-world-krijgt-releasedatum

Earlier this year, former console giant Sega made a deal with Nintendo to publish three games exclusively for the Wii U.  One of which is an entry in the now common Mario & Sonic At The Olympic Games series, and one of the other ones is the latest entry in the Sonic series, Sonic: Lost World.  We got a chance to try our hand at a level at the Nintendo booth during the GameStop Expo.

Right off the bat, one might say some of the nuances Lost World‘s gameplay comes from the Super Mario Galaxy games.  This is because a lot of running Sonic is doing is on random floating masses of land where the gravity allows players to see that he can run straightforward, to the side, and upside down.  On top of this, in order to get to a different landmass, Sonic has to use a spring to jump and maneuver his way to point B–very similar to how Mario can use the waggle stars in Mario Galaxy to end up on different planets.

The game features traditional controls that you’d expect from a platformer, but this is a Sonic game, so it’s speed and semi-on-rails action that people have come to expect.  While it isn’t as horribly slow as the “werehog” sections in Sonic Unleashed, Lost Worlds isn’t as much about the speed as it is the action and platforming.

That isn’t to say the rushed feeling of a Sonic game has vanished.  It’s still extremely fast, and it’s still Sonic, but this decreased pace allows players to really explore the worlds the developers drew up.

Traditional supersonic sprinting is done with the right trigger, and like the other 3D Sonic games, Sonic can perform homing jumps on rows of enemies for massive combos and quicker progress.

Only one level was available to us, and in supersonic fashion, it felt like a blur.  Sonic: Lost World looks to be solid and has an October 22 release date for both the Wii U and 3DS platforms.  Until then, stay tuned to SmashPad for more on this game and those featured at the GameStop Expo.

Title: Sonic: Lost Worlds
Platform: Wii U, Nintendo 3DS
Publisher: Nintendo
Developer: Sega
Genre: Adventure
Release Date: October 22, 2013
ESRB Rating: E-10
Developer's Twitter: @NintendoAmerica

Earlier this year, former console giant Sega made a deal with Nintendo to publish three games exclusively for the Wii U.  One of which is an entry in the now common Mario & Sonic At The Olympic Games series, and one of the other ones is the latest entry in the Sonic series, Sonic: Lost World.  We got a chance to try our hand at a level at the Nintendo booth during the GameStop Expo. Right off the bat, one […]

48250-sonic-lost-world-krijgt-releasedatum

Earlier this year, former console giant Sega made a deal with Nintendo to publish three games exclusively for the Wii U.  One of which is an entry in the now common Mario & Sonic At The Olympic Games series, and one of the other ones is the latest entry in the Sonic series, Sonic: Lost World.  We got a chance to try our hand at a level at the Nintendo booth during the GameStop Expo.

Right off the bat, one might say some of the nuances Lost World‘s gameplay comes from the Super Mario Galaxy games.  This is because a lot of running Sonic is doing is on random floating masses of land where the gravity allows players to see that he can run straightforward, to the side, and upside down.  On top of this, in order to get to a different landmass, Sonic has to use a spring to jump and maneuver his way to point B–very similar to how Mario can use the waggle stars in Mario Galaxy to end up on different planets.

The game features traditional controls that you’d expect from a platformer, but this is a Sonic game, so it’s speed and semi-on-rails action that people have come to expect.  While it isn’t as horribly slow as the “werehog” sections in Sonic Unleashed, Lost Worlds isn’t as much about the speed as it is the action and platforming.

That isn’t to say the rushed feeling of a Sonic game has vanished.  It’s still extremely fast, and it’s still Sonic, but this decreased pace allows players to really explore the worlds the developers drew up.

Traditional supersonic sprinting is done with the right trigger, and like the other 3D Sonic games, Sonic can perform homing jumps on rows of enemies for massive combos and quicker progress.

Only one level was available to us, and in supersonic fashion, it felt like a blur.  Sonic: Lost World looks to be solid and has an October 22 release date for both the Wii U and 3DS platforms.  Until then, stay tuned to SmashPad for more on this game and those featured at the GameStop Expo.

Date published: 08/29/2013
/ 5 stars

One comment on “GSE 2013: “Sonic Lost World” Hands-On

  1. Pingback: SmashPad Live from GameStop Expo 2013 | SmashPad

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